Botanic Gardens Belfast – A Nice Public Park
Botanic Gardens Belfast   A Nice Public Park

Image by infomatique
I always considered the Botanic Gardens in Belfast to be a bit like the People’s Park in Limerick but with an interesting old glasshouse that is not in the best of condition. The People’s Park in Limerick includes a beautiful victorian fountain and an identical fountain was located in the Belfast Botanic Gardens but it is now located in Victoria Square at the centre of Belfast.

Botanic Gardens was established in 1828 by the Belfast Botanic and Horticultural Society. Originally known as the Belfast Botanic Garden, the site contained exotic tree species and impressive plant collections from the southern hemisphere, many of which can still be seen in the park.

The Palm House contains a range of tropical plants, hanging baskets, seasonal displays and birds of paradise, and is one of the earliest examples of a glasshouse made from curved iron and glass. The building was designed by Sir Charles Lanyon, who also helped design parts of nearby Queen’s University. The foundation stone was laid in 1839 and the two wings were completed in 1840 by leading ironmaster, Richard Turner. The dome was added in 1852.

Botanic Gardens Belfast – A Nice Public Park
Botanic Gardens Belfast   A Nice Public Park

Image by infomatique
I always considered the Botanic Gardens in Belfast to be a bit like the People’s Park in Limerick but with an interesting old glasshouse that is not in the best of condition. The People’s Park in Limerick includes a beautiful victorian fountain and an identical fountain was located in the Belfast Botanic Gardens but it is now located in Victoria Square at the centre of Belfast.

Botanic Gardens was established in 1828 by the Belfast Botanic and Horticultural Society. Originally known as the Belfast Botanic Garden, the site contained exotic tree species and impressive plant collections from the southern hemisphere, many of which can still be seen in the park.

The Palm House contains a range of tropical plants, hanging baskets, seasonal displays and birds of paradise, and is one of the earliest examples of a glasshouse made from curved iron and glass. The building was designed by Sir Charles Lanyon, who also helped design parts of nearby Queen’s University. The foundation stone was laid in 1839 and the two wings were completed in 1840 by leading ironmaster, Richard Turner. The dome was added in 1852.